murphyormel

wacky reflections from a nutcracker wannabe

Category: observation

Laugh yourself to better mental health.

Sometimes comedic therapy is all we have…

  • …those infamous bacon and hot pocket skits compliments of Jim Gaffigan. (Ok, anything Gaffigan!)
  • …Old men in skinny pants
  • Freudian slips said to your own mother: “sure, we would like to come over for Sunday dinner if you aren’t doing someone.”
  • …I recently (mis)heard a student tell my class their passion: collecting vintage wine and handcuffs, when instead he said cuff links. (And yes, I apologized profusely as the class laughed and immediately called my supervisor to report myself.)
  • …really, really bad tattoos. Likely, a decision made while you were liquored up while friends both encouraged the poor choice and enjoyed selfies with you.
  • …leggings are not actual pants. How did this ridiculous fad reach all sizes of people, now complimented by lace up wedges and a crop top? (Yes, I am presently in another airport.)
  • Algorithms, robot arms, living with your mother, just the sound of meat called brisket and/or the “wallowitz coefficient” to supplement a new view on Superheros thanks to The Big Bang Theory. 
  • How is camoflage a fashion statement outside of the forest? We see you.
  • …”Literally” everything Rob Lowe says on the classic, Parks and Rec.
  • …that the ever changing rules in U.S. healthcare are proportionate to the ever changing rules social media brings parenting today’s teen
  • …my 70+ yr old dad has been pulled over by local law enforcement on an early morning for driving (puttering) too SLOW on his scooter
  • My sweet niece practicing yoga, singing Happy birthday in Italian, or making a sand castle for her Auntie M 
  • A good friend’s son jumping head over tail on the family dog or writing a story about aliens just because he knows it is ok to play, take risk and be his best self without judgement
  • How about those blue-tooth ear pieces colleagues wear 24/7? You speak only to have them reply to their call but smile at you
  • This is almost as good as finding yourself leaving a voicemail BEFORE the beep, because the recording is so real.
  • Hearing my daughter tell me her life is over, because I shut down Netflix for month one of high school as we test the grade waters.
  • Shag carpet and shellac still exist in the RV world and actually win for aesthetics in the “I have disposable income so let’s trade up of late age road trips.”
  • And because I am sitting directly next to a wannabe LA based actor with the the most nasally, startling voice EVER, cheers to karma for bringing us laughter when we least expect.

Breathe deeply, laugh hard and be well. 

Mel

  

the creative brain. know us. love us anyway.

I don’t typically post articles that are not my own, but this captures so perfectly the “science” of a creative brain, especially as many of you know and love someone who might fight this internal challenge.  For those of us caught in this cycle, the succinctness of this article articulates that creativity isn’t manic, it is wiring. Cheers to the author, Justin Gammill.

“It has been proven that highly creative people’s brains work quite differently than other brains. That special brain wiring that can create such wonderful art, music, and writing can often lead to strain in a relationship, because of those differences. If you’ve ever loved a highly creative person, you know that it can seem like they live in their own little world at times, and that thought isn’t far from the truth. Here are some things to keep in mind when you are in love with a highly creative person:

10 Things to keep in Mind When Loving a Highly Creative Person

1. Their Minds Don’t Slow Down
The highly creative mind is one that is running at full speed all the time. Although it can be a source of crazy, spontaneous fun – it can also be a burden. Highly creative people rarely keep normal sleep cycles, and are often prone to bouncing from one task to another throughout the day. It can be exhausting to try to keep up.

2. They are Cyclical
The flow of creativity is a cycle, full of highs and lows. Some people may consider this “manic” behavior, but in reality, it is just how the creative process works. Keep this in mind as your partner goes through these natural ebbs and flows. The low periods aren’t permanent.

3. They Need Time Alone
Creative minds need air to breathe. Whether it is their own little work space or an escape to somewhere quiet, they need a time and place to be alone with their thoughts. Some people are inclined to think that if nothing is being said that there is something wrong, but with creative people, that is not the case. They are just working within their own head.

4. They are Intensely Focused
When a creative person is on task, they are fiercely intense. The change from being scatter-brained to hyper-focused can be difficult to deal with, so just understand that it is how their brains work. Don’t get frustrated.

5. Emotions Run Deeper
Creative people feel everything on a deeper level. What doesn’t seem like a big deal to you, can be crushing to them. It’s that same passion that goes into whatever they create that drives them to love you, so understand that with the good – comes the bad.

6. They Speak in Stories
Creative people often express themselves in experiences, instead of just saying what they want to say. It is a way of sharing themselves that personifies who they are. At times, it can be difficult to figure out what a creative person is saying, so don’t be afraid to read between the lines.

7. They Battle with Themselves
Being creative can be a serious internal struggle. Motivation, enthusiasm, direction, and drive can all be issues for creative people. Some days it is hard for them just to get out of bed, and other days you can’t get them to slow down. Be patient in the lulls, because there is usually a burst of activity right around the corner.

8. Intuition is Important
Creative people, because of their intense emotional tendencies, tend to rely on intuition over logic. They go with their gut. Some people consider this to be more on the “impulsive” end of the spectrum. The creative mind doesn’t rely on logic to make a decision, it relies on experience and passion.

9. They Struggle with Confidence
When people create, especially for a living, they are always struggling with acceptance. That is art. They have to wear their hearts on their sleeves, and so they always question whether or not what they are producing is good enough. Being supportive is the key to loving a creative person.

10. Growing Up is Hard to Do
Creative people are almost always children at heart. That care-free nature can seem immature and impetuous – but it is all part of the deal. Understand that the aspects of their creative brains that you love are the same ones that make them somewhat irresponsible when it comes to being an adult.”

Om Shanti,

Mel

http://theearthchild.co.za/10-things-to-keep-in-mind-when-loving-a-highly-creative-person/

live your way into the answer.

The cool part of living your way to the answers is that you will be living the questions too.  And better yet, in the now.

Sounds a bit bass ackwards, but it isn’t. If we choose to take each day one moment at a time, truly living in the breath and present, our answers will simply arrive. When we over-think the questions, our own head actually gets in the way.

Sure, I enjoy my lists.  And yes, I did actually place large pink sticky notes on the wall to itemize searching my dharma* (our true purpose in life), but in creating these lists of what I love, what makes me happiest, how can I find balance and wellness, even how salary plays a role in my future, I was still thinking…over-thinking…looking for the solution rather than letting the solution find me.

Even this past week, I walked away from a meeting feeling like my peer had spun me in a circle 50 times and sent me off in yet another direction of intrigue.

I continue to remind myself that I am safe today (even when anxiety says the opposite), and in each day, I get to begin again, forgive, be gentle with myself, love, nurture, show gratitude for higher learnings and lessons, and “be” again.

They say the “present” is not an accident. It is in fact a daily gift.

Cheers to being given opportunity to live our way to the answer that is right and good and safe for only us. 🌺

Metta,

Mel

Type A in search of Dharma.

Type A in search of her Dharma.

 

live the questions now, by my Buddha Board.

 
 Psychotherapist and yoga teacher Stephen Cope’s new book The Great Work of Your Life challenges us to find our true purpose in life, which he believes all of us can achieve.

“I was daydreaming in Mass and decided you shouldn’t talk in the car.” – daughter

thank goodness we have silliness to offset our vulnerable days.

And yes, we all have our own curious observations, but I feel drawn to pen/paper to share, 1. so my aging brain doesn’t forget, and 2. to validate we are all one in silliness….

– What is the new attraction to emoticons at the end of every text or Instagram post?  I recently found myself downloading very sassy ones (and actually paying $).  Seems like I’ve crossed into addiction.

–  One probably shouldn’t decide MID-tattoo that tipping up-front makes more sense than once the one hour, under the knife experience is complete.

– Why do I repeatedly have to tell my 14-year-old that “leggings are not pants”?  (And don’t judge me as a helicopter mom, my not so baby girl is 5’7″ blonde, blue-eyed, full-lipped, slender and looks about 21!  You too would make her change.)

– Ever notice we put food in a fridge that is magnetic, but we don’t use old style thermometers, because of mercury? (Again, it becomes clear why I’m not the sibling with the PhD in radio-chemistry.)

–  Why is it that those days when you feel a little cloudy or words don’t come as smoothly are always the wrong days?  Teaching last week, I was high on the flaky dial. Words weren’t coming, concepts didn’t land as I like, and I left my phone at home. As I finally had to admit to my class that I was not 100% “on”, one of the students noted my shirt read “Find your center”.

–  Why is it we all just feel smarter in a book store? Don’t even have to read, just drink a coffee and the magic happens.

–  Is it wrong for a mom- in advance of an early “hang out with the new boyfriend”, to give advice on how to french kiss?  No one told me in 8th grade, and Bobby Brown scared the hell out of me with that tongue.  I didn’t want her to be “Bobby Browned”, so I explained the technique, complete with use of the word “retreat” and “engage”.  Sounds a little creepy on paper now that I type this note.

– When my baby was little, I knew I had limited chances to coach a team that required real knowledge, so I signed up to be an asst. coach for 1st and 2nd grade girls soccer.  So, with a “how to” book in hand, work colleagues drawing me drills on cocktail napkins, and a positive attitude, I coached the 1-7 “Pee Wee Fireflies”.  No, we weren’t the winningest team, but I’m confident I received more hugs than EVERY other team with a dad coach.  Moms, go for it!

– What’s up with this bizarre magnetic connection to our phones?  Remember those strings grandma tied on your mittens through your coat sleeves?  Last night, my daughter came home to tell me she lost $20 in change from dinner at the mall, so when I asked if she had her phone, she said, “of course”.  Magnetic connection to a phone but not money?

–  Why is a pile of completed books on my nightstand an accomplishment, but I never once took a photo of the 30+ bags of leaves I raked every year for years when I owned my last home?

– Holy Thursday Mass: “I was daydreaming in Mass and decided you shouldn’t talk in the car when we pick up (boyfriend).”  Next Day:  “I’ve changed my mind and think you should talk. Here is what you can say….He plays hockey and…….his mom does yoga.”  Day after “date”, “Why did you say that?  If it isn’t on the approved list, please do not say it at all.”

And so my friends, I now know why chauffeurs have a plexiglass shield between themselves and their passengers.

Cheers to moments so curious they can’t help but make you smile….

Mel

reading glasses do not alter curious observation.

curiosity killed the cat.

  • What the hell does that even mean?*
  • Why is the first time your teenager tells you, “you are the worst mom, ever”, your therapist tells you, “congratulations, this is healthy development and a necessary separation for her growth”?
  • How is possible to be terrified and excited at the same time?
  • How is gray hair a sign of wisdom?
  • Why does “doing the right thing” sometimes hurt so much?
  • Why is learning to breathe a technique?  (And lol, there are many that I teach that DO actually work to either heat up the body or calm.  (Let’s just say Nadi Shodna in traffic looks like I’m picking my nose.))
  • Why does “fake it till you make it” actually work?
  • Why doesn’t the St. Louis Bread Co / Panera Bread market a ‘morning happy hour’ or ‘speed dating’ concept for the 70+ crowd?  I’ve been there with my mom.  She talks to strangers naturally, hugs and touches shoulders of those she doesn’t know well, enjoys the low key coffee and pastries.  It’s perfect.  They talk about their ailments, what cousin’s cousin’s children are married or single while they pass around grand-baby photos with their shared reading glasses. The coffee wraps could be used for collecting phone numbers.
  • Why is being with the people we love the most in the world, and who love us to infinity as well, so darn stressful at a holiday?
  • When did I become the subject of my own teaching on “the dark side of consumerism”?  Yes, binge-watching Netflix newly released, ‘House of Cards’ in one weekend should be a text-book case study.  The a-ha moment in class as I admitted my addiction stunned even me.
  • Why can’t Apple add a photo feature so my male, British speaking Siri is looking at me when he speaks?
  • Why doesn’t the school system allow the parents a choice in our children growing older?  I offer every year, but no.
  • Why is it easier for me to trash the greasy, thick, sloppy, ‘left in sink’ too long pan, than wash?
  • Or better, rerun the dish washer so you can postpone emptying?
  • Why does mouthwash taste so awful?  And for that matter, the prep beverage for a colonoscopy?  Seriously, markete(e)r friends, simple economics…. consumers pay a price to meet a need. Price increases as demand increases.
  • Why did anyone let me buy a condo with a balcony outside my soon-to-be high school blonde beauty’s bed room?  (Probably not appropriate to use Rapunzel and “conceal and carry” in the same sentence. It isn’t like I’m a stranger or ever a saint to the teenage sneak factor.)
  • How can I remember details of a professional contact from five years ago: know their political affiliation, connection to others in my network, what Board positions they hold, recall what school they graduated and know they are cousins with a hottie who has a knack for great jokes, but ………I can’t remember what I made for dinner last night?
  • I have convinced myself grapes with pizza is a meal.  Not really a question but probably should be.
  • Why is laundry, picking up the dog poo, or unloading groceries called a chore for the teenager but it is real life for the parent?  I call it, “You live here, you help, you eat.”
  • St. Murphy struck on St. Patrick’s Day.  Why did my teenager find the container of corn in the microwave 24 hours AFTER it was to be a compliment to our evening meal?

And finally, why DIDN’T my $4K lasik procedure guarantee that BAM, one month after my early 40s birthday, I wouldn’t need these silly readers to make my curious observations?  When I had to wear glasses, I disliked them. Now, I forget they are on my own head.

Cheers to never-ending curiosity,

Mel


* Wikipedia:  Curiosity killed the cat” is a proverb used to warn of the dangers of unnecessary investigation or experimentation. A less frequently seen rejoinder to “curiosity killed the cat” is “, but satisfaction brought it back“.

The corn.

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