murphyormel

wacky reflections from a nutcracker wannabe

Category: meaningful

Anything happens all the time. 

May you meet Joy in 2016.

May you try new things, laugh a lot, sit in quiet a few minutes each day, kiss someone special, journey toward good health, look inward and remember why you love what you do and who you are beyond a title, make new and loving friends, take silly photos, be creative in your own way, truly hear the beauty of a wind chime telling you a story, read for pleasure, feel grass under your toes, ask for hugs early and often, do the thing you think you cannot do, love who you are today, and never let age trump adventure!

Follow your bliss, be bold, trust a higher power knows us, and be your best self.

…..Because “anything happens all the time.*”

Joy says so too.

Metta and Merry 2016,

Mel


Pixarwikia.com: Meet Disney’s Joy** (Inside Out)

* a favorite movie quote: “This is where I leave you”

An ode to simplicity, compliments of our pioneering Pilgrims…

A pilgrimage is a journey. Risk, devotion, loss, prayer, focus, faith, family, truth and fear.

And while a gluttonous adventure of food, football and fun is indeed to be had this week, we must embrace and appreciate sacrifice of those early pioneers whose pilgrimage affords today’s tiny delights.

An ode is intended to be sung. I would recommend the following tiny delights of gratitude are melodically embraced on thanksgiving eve to the classic, Jim Neighbors’, “Go tell it on the mountain”…
(ideally just after the reflection, and as Uncle Earl is sharpening the carving knives.)

Finding grace and gratitude in simple things:

  • The Butterball people
  • Dr. Seuss
  • People’s annual issue of the Sexiest Man Alive
  • White twinkle lights
  • Reality television that turns everyday folks into front page tabloid fodder and/or a millionaire
  • A Presidential front runner with a signature swoop and campaign slogan that should read, “Drump (on) Power.”
  • Peanut butter and protein shakes
  • Modigliani
  • Competitive sporting events bringing millions of people together, each simultaneously focused on peace, admiration and contagious energy.
  • Neighbors who not only embrace, but also glitter their lawn with a Home Depot warehouse full of holiday cheer and plastic artwork (stealing a selfie once they head to bed makes for a fun online post)
  • Ice skating while holding hands and giggling under a twinkling moon on a cold winter night
  • Free speech and equal pay (oops- $.79 to the $1.00 isn’t equal)
  • The ballet
  • My cozy Tempur-pedic, plush and inviting, with it’s crisp white Westin-like duvet and down pillows
  • Glitter and Swarovski crystals
  • Erasers and spell check
  • Maraschino cherries
  • Hand-written notes
  • A lavender or lemongrass-scented bubble bath
  • Gerberas or tulips that arrive at your front door for no reason
  • The beautiful (and oh yeah, talented) Canadian Tenors
  • A Coach Swagger handbag
  • My signature red lipstick, sassy boots and a little black dress
  • Technology that keeps friends and family close, across a country, across an ocean

And obviously a more serious thank you to our pioneering founders…..the evolution to high end toilet paper, dental hygiene and wet wipes. 

Come from a place of peace. Act with grace. Get your ode on, and thank a pilgrim this Thanksgiving.

Mel

  

we are all students.

through my lens as instructor…a personal teaching statement.

Fresh out of graduate school and only five years into the beginning of a rock-star career in marketing communications and management, I felt the itch to be in front of the students rather than one with the students. As such, I started substitute teaching part-time at the local college and found a great high from not only leading a class, but also encouraging discussion, debate, thoughtfulness, and insight from varying age, ethnicity, gender and work lifestyle.

In those first few semesters, I was likely prepping far more than the students themselves, as I was terrified they would ask questions I couldn’t answer; thereby, feeling the need to know everything to prove myself. Eventually; however, I learned that not every instructor does know everything, nor is there magic in that which we do know. Humility comes from a student explaining a new way to look at an idea, questioning a test answer, or politely finding discrepancy in the text.

Today, over 25 years into a marketing, sales and communications career, that itch has not faded, it has blossomed. No longer do I lead a class, I am also a student. I learn from each new group of students; sometimes those who fly through with an A, and absolutely from those who work hard to capture a C. They each teach one another, and I am a guide along their journey of knowledge. One amazing and inspiring discipline, one branch on the tree, one sign on their road.

And while prep is still critical, my own confidence in my craft, coupled with years of global and domestic marketing and management experience, has enabled me to demonstrate variations in textbook language and outside-the-classroom application. I can spot a challenging definition and translate. I can carefully define tactics to support strategy. And with years of experience, I can see strategy and tactics as two very different, but critical ways of thinking.

The application of marketing must engage the student, meaning products/services they understand and/or frequent, so, together, we find the marketing appeal, objective, strategy and tactics to facilitate discussion and student interest.

My career outside the classroom has been one of privilege. I have over 20 years experience- both Business-to-Business (B2B) and Business-to-Consumer (B2C) – marketing communications, community outreach, public speaking, crisis communication and sales strategy, both domestic and international.  I have additionally held a number of local community Board roles, including president for the local American Marketing Association (AMA) and Administrative Champion to a starter Toastmaster’s International club for a 1500 colleague-based hospital. No class misses a hint of my background. Each are touched by examples from my wide range of healthcare and consumer product experience in a way that aligns with AMA learnings and Toastmaster International guidelines.

Each semester, I ensure students understand they are a brand ambassador for their school, work, favorite sports team, etc., WHILE marketing their own personal brand at all times. My icebreaker may be intimidating on day one, but it never fails, as students ‘Toastmaster’ their way to the front of the classroom to ‘Be the Brand’ through an introduction of themselves to new classmates.

Laughter, story-telling, leadership, owning your personal brand image, public speaking and thoughtful weekly online chapter article searches, assure me students walk away with not simply memorization of chapter information, but also the ability to conceptualize and translate into something memorable. It is critical to me, and I assure transparency to the students, that they learn what they need in our time together, not a box full of memorized terminology.

Candidly, there are times when textbook language doesn’t fit how a meeting in front of the Board of Directors or a C-suite executive will flow outside the classroom. Those individuals may not be trained in marketing lingo, so the student must understand the root of their classroom work before they are truly available to deploy learnings in an experiential approach.

I am a high energy, fast-paced instructor. I expect students to do the work, engage often, connect with fellow students, and in return, I give them concrete examples of both my personal successes and plenty of opportunities along the way where I learned through error. We laugh, we push one another, and they do not leave the course without a thorough understanding that we are ALL marketers, even without the title or the paid experience on our LinkedIn profile.

Someday perhaps, I will find a way to teach that concept to managers, students and peers universally and outside my classroom.

Be the Brand.

Mel

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Why does doing what is right hurt so much?

Years ago, my dad gifted me a fabulous and original quote that he kept in his office that says, “In my law practice and in my life, I have followed two basic ethics: does it appear to be improper, and would my Mother be upset if she knew I was doing it.” 

Other than ending a sentence in a preposition, my siblings and I appreciate and do our best to honor and live this significant sentiment with great respect and authenticity. But for every cause, there is indeed effect and consequence.

  • It isn’t always easy to take the road less traveled. 
  • Most folks will not risk short-term future for the big picture win, so to lose anything along the way is a risk.
  • The high road and the “right” thing are subjective. Tolerance and definition vary.
  • Taking the road less traveled doesn’t always mean the outcome works in your favor. Unknowing stakes can be high. And painful.
  • Choosing what others won’t, can hurt.
  • The difference between doing nothing at all and doing something with great risk is personal.

But “the time is always right to do what is right.” (MLK, Jr.)

All of us at this age have experiences where we have been faced with a decision that made us hero or villain, mentor or mentee, parent or friend. And candidly, sometimes, the choice for what is right, hurts. 

We wonder was it right after all.

As a parent.

As a girlfriend, partner or spouse.

As a professional.

So we brace ourselves to face the music. And we trust intuition and a higher power to let us live our questions and way into the answer.

It isn’t easy, and missteps DO occur, but integrity is everything… so we begin again and again. Over and over again.

Cheers to being gentle with ourselves when the jump rope throws an unexpected double Dutch trick, continuing to trust unconditional love is out there, and knowing each day is a safe start to a new beginning.

I commit to jump forward with deep, full, three-part breaths often and always, if you will.

Namaste,

Mel

 

live your way into the answer.

The cool part of living your way to the answers is that you will be living the questions too.  And better yet, in the now.

Sounds a bit bass ackwards, but it isn’t. If we choose to take each day one moment at a time, truly living in the breath and present, our answers will simply arrive. When we over-think the questions, our own head actually gets in the way.

Sure, I enjoy my lists.  And yes, I did actually place large pink sticky notes on the wall to itemize searching my dharma* (our true purpose in life), but in creating these lists of what I love, what makes me happiest, how can I find balance and wellness, even how salary plays a role in my future, I was still thinking…over-thinking…looking for the solution rather than letting the solution find me.

Even this past week, I walked away from a meeting feeling like my peer had spun me in a circle 50 times and sent me off in yet another direction of intrigue.

I continue to remind myself that I am safe today (even when anxiety says the opposite), and in each day, I get to begin again, forgive, be gentle with myself, love, nurture, show gratitude for higher learnings and lessons, and “be” again.

They say the “present” is not an accident. It is in fact a daily gift.

Cheers to being given opportunity to live our way to the answer that is right and good and safe for only us. 🌺

Metta,

Mel

Type A in search of Dharma.

Type A in search of her Dharma.

 

live the questions now, by my Buddha Board.

 
 Psychotherapist and yoga teacher Stephen Cope’s new book The Great Work of Your Life challenges us to find our true purpose in life, which he believes all of us can achieve.

more than just satisfying, we crave meaningful.

After nearly 25 years of rock star professional projects and 14 years as a mama, I am at this crazy crossroads of study, research, truth, wellness, teaching, and much meditation and prayer towards a next step professional and personal path. An earlier post called it, ‘A Fork and A Road.”

Still, as I journal and study, I am finding this may simply be mid-life chasing simplicity and balance. And this type A, high-achieving, little delta I face every day called ego. Just too many forks, and too many roads to enjoy.

This is simply a gift-given moment of transition and change in this topsy-turvy, Seussville-themed road called life.

Clarity however hit home in the last few days as a physician friend was speaking to me regarding a successful diagnosis of a brain tumor many years ago. His telling me this experience wasn’t even specifically about meaning in his work as a healer. He was quite matter of fact re. his now friend’s passion for a craft I too enjoy and perhaps for inspiration, post diagnosis.  But his matter of fact manner struck me as a profound moment in what I choose next for me….specifically, meaningful work.

  • when my daughter took her first step, it was indeed meaningful.
  • when she cleaned the dishes yesterday without being asked, satisfying.
  • when I was gifted the opportunity to be part of a team to market and build a hospital that will last the next 150 years, meaningful.
  • when I helped produce a television commercial for pork-chops, satisfying.

Each of us are given moments to write our own story, so grab a pen and absorb, observe, cherish and witness.  Will you look at the next moment that touches you as simply satisfying or truly meaningful?

“The miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive.” – Thich Nhat Hanh

Play ball. Play big. Play with meaning.

Mel

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